As cocktails go, the Brown Derby isn’t a household name. But it has a history as enjoyable as the drink itself—a crisp and surprisingly harmonious blend of whiskey, honey, and grapefruit.

 

Bubble tea is ubiquitous in Taiwan, but so are the thick, colorful straws used to slurp the drink. That’s not stopping the country from joining a growing number of places across the world implementing bans on single-use plastic straws.

 

With a few minor exceptions, there are really only two ways to say “tea” in the world. One is like the English term—té in Spanish and tee in Afrikaans are two examples. The other is some variation of cha, like chay in Hindi.

 

Unofficially, everyone knows that different kinds of booze will give them a different kind of night. But now, data from one of the largest surveys on drug and alcohol use finally prove it: hard liquor gives most people that extra ~swag~.

 

Tequila is for sipping, not shots—and certainly not for chugging out of a beer bottle with trace amounts of Mexico’s most famous export.

 

Long before India’s burgeoning bar scene spawned celebrity mixologists and cocktails with cult renown, the most refreshing, distinctive drinks were made by village grandmothers and at roadside dhabas: puckeringly sour aam panna, made from green mangos, or the musky, beet-red fermented vegetable juice kanji.

 

I rarely spend more than $20 on a bottle of wine. Often, it’s closer to $10.

 

The most expensive coffee in the world can go for $100 a cup, but it comes with a hidden cost: the well-being of a forest-dwelling cat-like creature native to southeast Asia.

 

A small beer company in Florida hopes to protect marine life by developing better packaging.

 

Matthew Hartings hates gin. “Something about that flavor doesn’t sit right with me,” writes Hartings, a professor of chemistry at American University.

 
 
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